Christmas songs with the "soul of Dave"

Ryan K. Michaels

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When I bring "Jolly Ol' Saint Dave" fully into this website, I will add links to its referenced songs at the end, as I have done with many other stories. I will also at that time give the actual musicians their due and proper credit. But for now... please take a listen to these soulful renditions as 100% David Addison.

NOTE: I realize that "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" shouldn't technically have any supporting piano behind it, but I can easily imagine that being layered in as the song plays through the episode's ending credits. And honestly... like the version of "Silent Night" I have selected, this is the only "Merry Little Christmas" I have found so far find where I feel the harmonica achieves the magnificent depths of the "soul of Dave."

Marlena, I hope you're on board with this. :)
 

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I am totally on board with this! When I was writing this story I knew I wanted to have David play his harmonica, so I went on YouTube to listen to people play Christmas songs with a harmonica. I thought these two songs sounded the best. I really like the versions you attached here, especially the "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas" one.
 
I was starting to feel sad that the holidays are almost over, and then I listened to these Christmas songs played on the harmonica, and that "Christmas-y" feeling came back to me.

The thing is... you have to envision David Addison playing that harmonica around a cozy fire with Maddie at his side.

Thanks, Ryan, for finding and posting these beautiful versions of two holiday classic songs.
 
Marlena, I have a habit in general of reflecting on the frustratingly unstoppable (or even un-slow-able) nature of time, and I am also fighting the melancholy of the holidays almost being over. Even back in the day, I always mourned the passing of the old year more than I celebrated the arrival of a new one. The upside is that means I am living "a wonderful life", and I don't take that for granted.

Thank you for writing the story that inspired me to track down those songs. Not only do I feel these versions capture "the soul of Dave", but I also feel their slowness represents his own desire to live every moment of life to its fullest. The "Silent Night" I chose is soooo slow, in fact, that I envision the scene in which he plays it being shown onscreen in slow motion, almost entirely from Maddie's point of view, with the flames from the barrel around which David and others at the shelter have gathered dancing gracefully and the occasional ember rising skyward without hurry. David is showing Maddie a piece of his world, away from work, and it is a noble piece at that. They are both enjoying the company around them, and David - with God and Maddie as his witnesses- is joyously helping to brighten the Christmas of people less fortunate than he is. The moment could go on forever, as far as he (and maybe even she) is concerned.

The same goes for "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", which is a bit peppier but still slow, as this moment now focuses entirely on David and Maddie as he departs from her lavish home. Life is still simple, and their relationship at this point is still pure and unlimited potential. In spite of the growing sense that something magical is unfolding between them, he is going to hold onto this moment - this sweet, passing note amongst many in the overall song of their story - as long as he can, as well.

Happy last hours of 2022, everyone. May all and only the best find you in 2023, and may you find and foster the joy in every last moment of it, just as David Addison would back in 1987.
 
Marlena, I have a habit in general of reflecting on the frustratingly unstoppable (or even un-slow-able) nature of time, and I am also fighting the melancholy of the holidays almost being over. Even back in the day, I always mourned the passing of the old year more than I celebrated the arrival of a new one. The upside is that means I am living "a wonderful life", and I don't take that for granted.

Thank you for writing the story that inspired me to track down those songs. Not only do I feel these versions capture "the soul of Dave", but I also feel their slowness represents his own desire to live every moment of life to its fullest. The "Silent Night" I chose is soooo slow, in fact, that I envision the scene in which he plays it being shown onscreen in slow motion, almost entirely from Maddie's point of view, with the flames from the barrel around which David and others at the shelter have gathered dancing gracefully and the occasional ember rising skyward without hurry. David is showing Maddie a piece of his world, away from work, and it is a noble piece at that. They are both enjoying the company around them, and David - with God and Maddie as his witnesses- is joyously helping to brighten the Christmas of people less fortunate than he is. The moment could go on forever, as far as he (and maybe even she) is concerned.

The same goes for "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", which is a bit peppier but still slow, as this moment now focuses entirely on David and Maddie as he departs from her lavish home. Life is still simple, and their relationship at this point is still pure and unlimited potential. In spite of the growing sense that something magical is unfolding between them, he is going to hold onto this moment - this sweet, passing note amongst many in the overall song of their story - as long as he can, as well.

Happy last hours of 2022, everyone. May all and only the best find you in 2023, and may you find and foster the joy in every last moment of it, just as David Addison would back in 1987.
Whenever I write Moonlighting fanfic, I always try to envision it as an episode onscreen. I am so glad that you gave this one an actual soundtrack that I can listen to, Ryan. Thank you for that.
 
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